Scientists at Work: Teaching Robots to Think

Episode 53

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Scientists at Work: Teaching Robots to Think

Stat: 20 percent. The share of Americans who find the concept of machines doing most human jobs in the future extremely realistic.

Story: Will robots take our jobs? They’ll need a key human skill first—the ability to think. To find out just how near such a future is, we visited Ashley J. Llorens, chief of the Intelligent Systems Center at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. There, researchers are bridging the gap between machines programmed by humans and those that can teach themselves. 

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