Managing the nation's forage fish 

Most fisheries in the United States are regulated one species at a time. But regional councils and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are moving toward a strategy that takes into account the marine ecosystem as a whole—one called ecosystem-based fishery management. Even though the scientific models being developed are complex, some simple steps can be taken now to get us closer to this goal. Managing the nation’s forage fish—small, schooling prey species—in a more precautionary way can be a useful tool in this transition.

Kate and Nora
Kate and Nora
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On California Coast, Endangered Tern Depends on Healthy Anchovy Population

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On California Coast, Endangered Tern Depends on Healthy Anchovy Population

Early on Monday mornings from May through August, Kate Grabenstein heads to Huntington State Beach, south of Los Angeles in Orange County, to keep an eye on endangered California least terns as they nest in the sand and raise their young.

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Northern Anchovies, the Most Important Prey Fish in the U.S. Pacific Ocean

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More than 50 species of marine wildlife in the California Current ecosystem depend on northern anchovies as a vital part of their diets, including seabirds, larger fish such as salmon and tuna, and marine mammals like whales and sea lions.

Pelicans looking for forage fish
Pelicans looking for forage fish

Oregon unmanaged forage protections

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Whales
Whales
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