Protecting the Prey

Protecting the Prey
MDP mangrove shoal Matthew Potenski
© Matthew D Potenski

Forage fish hold Florida’s marine food webs together. They are a critical food source for fish and wildlife and make up nearly 20 percent of the commercial catch off Florida’s shores.

Few rules directly limit the amount of forage fish that can be taken from the water, yet worldwide demand for the species is skyrocketing. They are used as feed for fish farms and in products such as cosmetics and fertilizers.

Regulators should ensure sufficient abundance, variety, and sizes of forage species to meet the food needs of predators before expanding or limiting their fishing. Authorities also should protect forage fish habitats—such as mangroves, sea grasses, estuaries, rivers, and bays—including their water quantity and quality.

Failing to protect forage fish could cost jobs and revenue and hurt Florida’s legacy as the "Fishing Capital of the World."

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Agenda for America

Resources for federal, state, and local decision-makers

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Data-driven policymaking is not just a tool for finding new solutions for emerging challenges, it makes government more effective and better able to serve the public interest.

Data Visualization

Little Fish Are a Big Deal to Florida

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Data Visualization

Forage fish hold Florida’s marine food webs together. These small schooling fish feed on microscopic plants and animals and in turn serve as a critical food source for fish and wildlife. They make up about 20 percent of the commercial catch off Florida’s shores.

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Time to Protect "Most Important Fish in the Sea"