The Pew Charitable Trusts works in partnership with local communities and science research, conservation and land management organisations to secure long-term protection and hands-on stewardship of Australia’s Outback. Our work traverses the continent and extends to the nation’s diverse seas.

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National Campaigns

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National Campaigns

Find out more about Outback Australia, the country’s national network of marine sanctuaries, and the success of Indigenous conservation.

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State Campaign: Western Australia

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State Campaign: Western Australia

Find out more about protection of the Kimberley, the West Australia Outback, the Southwest marine regions, and the Great Western Woodlands.

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State Campaign: Northern Territory

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State Campaign: Northern Territory

Find out more about the Top End’s extraordinary coasts and lifestyle, Indigenous Rangers, amazing desert country, and the success of Fish River Station.

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State Campaign: Queensland

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State Campaign: Queensland

Find out more about Channel Country and the rivers that flow to Lake Eyre, Cape York’s natural wonders, and the Coral Sea.

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State Campaign: New South Wales

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State Campaign: New South Wales

Find out more about the success of the state’s marine sanctuaries.

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Australian Outback
Australian Outback
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My Country, Our Outback

Voices from the land on hope and change in Australia’s heartland

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Only a small number of vast natural landscapes—wild regions where ecological processes and the movement of wildlife function normally—remain on Earth. The Australian Outback is one of them.

The Australian Outback comprises a rich tapestry of deeply interconnected landscapes that cover more than 70% of the continent. Ochre-coloured soils are a recurring feature across this vast landscape, as shown in this aerial view of a gully system in Western Australia’s Pilbara region.
The Australian Outback comprises a rich tapestry of deeply interconnected landscapes that cover more than 70% of the continent. Ochre-coloured soils are a recurring feature across this vast landscape, as shown in this aerial view of a gully system in Western Australia’s Pilbara region.
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The Modern Outback

Nature, people and the future of remote Australia

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The Outback is the vast heartland of Australia. It includes places of exquisite beauty and wildness. It is an area of extremes, alternately lush and bountiful, harsh and inhospitable. The people and land of the Outback embody much that is most distinctive and characteristic of Australia. Yet while the Outback is quintessentially Australian, it is also a place of international consequence.