Few GOP Voters Would be Swayed by Endorsements

Jan 13, 2012

Political endorsements by prominent Republicans would provide little help for GOP candidates in the primaries and might be more of a liability than a benefit in a general election campaign.

Most Republican and Republican-leaning voters say that candidate endorsements by leading GOP figures, including George W. Bush, Sarah Palin and John McCain, would make no difference in their vote, according to a survey conducted Jan. 5-8 among 1,000 adults by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post. The same is true for endorsements by the governor of their state, their local newspaper, and their minister priest or rabbi.

Bush’s endorsement would have a potentially positive impact among Republican and Republican-leaning voters, as would Palin’s. Nearly three-in-ten (28%) say they would be more likely to vote for a candidate Bush supported, 11% would be less likely and 59% say Bush’s backing would make no difference. Nearly a quarter (23%) say they would be more likely to vote for a candidate supported by Palin, 15% say they would be less likely to vote for that candidate; 61% say a Palin endorsement would make no difference.

Read the full report, Few GOP Voters Would be Swayed by Endorsements, on the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press' Web site.

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