Garden Fresh Goes Over Well at School

Publication: The Charlotte Observer

Author: Shawn Cetrone


05/05/2012 - Chris, an Ebinport Elementary fourth-grader, took a deep breath as he prepared to taste lettuce and radishes for the first time.

First a small bite. Then another. And another. Then a thumbs-up.

“It’s really awesome,” he said.

Why did the 10-year-old, who saw leafy greens as gross, bother to sample salad in the first place?

Because, Chris said, he and classmates raised the veggies from seeds.

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New federal rules, taking effect this year, require schools to double the amount of fruits and vegetables served, increase whole grains, serve only low-fat or fat-free milk and limit trans fats. By 2022, schools must cut the amount of sodium served in half.

A poll released this month by the Pew Charitable Trusts’ Kids’ Safe and Healthful Foods Project shows most Americans favor improving food sold in school.

Eighty percent support a national nutritional standard for competitive foods like snacks and drinks sold “a la carte.”

Health advocates say school gardens are crucial to inspiring children to embrace fresher fare.

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Read the full article, Garden Fresh Goes Over Well at School, on the Charlotte Observer's website.

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