Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology Event: Policy Dialogue Exploring Genetically Modified Imports, Implications For Domestic Policies

Contact: Mona Miller, 202.552.2135, Kara Flynn, 202.347.9044 ext. 222


Washington, D.C. - 10/18/2005 - Is genetically-modified rice from abroad coming to your dinner table soon? With a number of countries developing their own GM crops, including rice, corn and soy, it is only a matter of time before such products arrive on U.S soil. But is the U.S. prepared to handle GM products coming from other countries? The U.S. government and agribusiness have been focused for several years on selling GM food to other countries; however, they have not focused as much on the possibility of GM products coming into the U.S. How are various industry sectors preparing to address this issue? What, if any, U.S. government policies are in place to address imports of GM food and commodities developed in other countries? How might U.S. consumers view these products?These are some of the questions that will be addressed by scientific experts, food industry attorneys, consumer groups, commodity organizations and others who deal daily with these issues. The Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology is sponsoring a policy dialogue, “GM Imports: Implications for U.S. Biotechnology Policy,” that will look at these and other issues. The event will be held on Wednesday, November 2, from 12:00 to 1:30 p.m. in the Holeman Lounge at the National Press Club - 529 14th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. Lunch will be served for all attendees.Participants include:

  • Joel Cohen, International Food Policy Research Institute
  • Mark Mansour, Morgan Lewis
  • Greg Jaffe, Center for Science in the Public Interest
  • David Coia, USA Rice Federation
The moderator for this dialogue will be Michael Rodemeyer, senior consultant to the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology.

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