Mobile Payments: The Good, the Bad, and the Confusing

Mobile Payments: The Good, the Bad, and the Confusing
2min 56sec

Ever use your smartphone to pay for parking or split the dinner bill with a friend? More people are using their phones as a mobile wallet and most mobile transactions work just fine. But with technology constantly evolving the rules that should protect consumers simply haven’t caught up.

In this animated video, follow along as Miles and his friend Pearl spend the day together, banking and buying music and coffee, all with their phones. Are the risks of using mobile payments holding people back and what can be done about them?

Mobile banking is fraught with regulatory overlap, gaps, and ambiguities.
Mobile banking is fraught with regulatory overlap, gaps, and ambiguities.
Data Visualization

Who Is Regulating Mobile Payments?

Quick View
Data Visualization

Every day, Americans use their smartphones to transfer money, pay for goods and services, and make donations. These transactions are collectively referred to as mobile payments. This infographic provides an overview of the many federal agencies that oversee the mobile payments marketplace, including payment processors and products.

Mobile banking is fraught with regulatory overlap, gaps, and ambiguities.
Mobile banking is fraught with regulatory overlap, gaps, and ambiguities.
White Paper

The Legal Framework of Mobile Payments

Quick View
White Paper

As the popularity of mobile payments grows, it becomes increasingly important to understand the legal framework in which these transactions take place.

Mobile banking is fraught with regulatory overlap, gaps, and ambiguities.
Mobile banking is fraught with regulatory overlap, gaps, and ambiguities.
Issue Brief

Mobile Payments

Regulatory gaps, ambiguities, and overlap

Quick View
Issue Brief

Mobile payments enable consumers to make financial transactions using their smartphones via a website, by sending a text message, or through an app. This technology, in turn, relies on many other consumer products and services, including credit, debit, and prepaid cards; wireless carriers; and nonbank providers such as Apple, Samsung, Google Wallet, and PayPal.