Report

Czechs' Commitment to Free Markets and Democracy Stays Strong Amidst Troubled Economic and Political Waters

  • May 19, 2010
  • By Erin Carrier-Kretschmer

A fall 2009 survey by the Pew Research Center's Global Attitudes Project found broad-based Czech discontent with the country's economic situation and the way democracy is working. Nonetheless, the data also showed a strong commitment among Czechs to free markets and democratic values. Moreover, Czechs ranked high among their peers in the region in terms of happiness with the transition to free market economics and multiparty politics.

As of fall 2009, seven-in-ten (70%) Czechs were dissatisfied with the way things were going in their country. Roughly eight-in-ten (81%) described the current economic situation in the Czech Republic as somewhat or very bad, with many (32%) saying very bad.

Czech economic discontent is consistent with public sentiment throughout the region: majorities in all former Eastern bloc countries polled rated their current economic situation as bad. This view was particularly widespread in Hungary (94%), Lithuania (93%) and Ukraine (91%) while least common, but still prevalent, in Russia (68%) and Poland (59%).

Read the full report, Czechs' Commitment to Free Markets and Democracy Stays Strong Amidst Troubled Economic and Political Waters, on the Pew Research Center's Web site.