What We're Reading: Top State Stories 9/13

  • September 13, 2017

TX: Supreme Court blocks effort to redraw Texas districts

statesman.com

A divided U.S. Supreme Court temporarily blocked a lower court from redrawing several Texas House and congressional districts that were found to have been created with the intent to discriminate against minority voters. The delay gives Texas time to defend the districts on appeal while continuing with the current maps heading into the 2018 elections.

WI: Wisconsin Senate approves $3B for Foxconn

ap.org

The Wisconsin Senate approved nearly $3 billion in cash payments for Foxconn Technology Group. The proposed subsidy for the Taiwanese company would be the largest ever from a U.S. state to a foreign company and 10 times bigger than anything Wisconsin has extended to a private business.

CA: California governor, legislative leaders allocate $30M for 'Dreamers'

latimes.com

Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown and California legislative leaders have agreed to earmark $30 million for financial aid and legal services to help young people brought into the country illegally as children, a response to President Donald Trump’s recent decision to cancel the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

US: Inequality persists despite U.S. progress on incomes and poverty

bloomberg.com

Steady U.S. economic growth helped household incomes climb to a record and reduced poverty last year, according to new census data. Yet inequality remained evident across income levels, race and gender, indicating there’s work to be done to improve the lot of all Americans.

HI: Hawaii says it’s first state to go cashless for pot sales

ap.org

All of Hawaii's eight licensed dispensaries have agreed to go cashless by Oct. 1. State officials are pushing for marijuana sales to be handled without cash in order to avoid robberies and other crimes targeting dispensaries.

MA: Massachusetts will hit Equifax with first state lawsuit over data breach

cnn.com

Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey said her office will take Equifax to court over a massive security breach that exposed the personal data of up to 143 million Americans. The state will argue that the company did not "maintain the appropriate safeguards to protect consumer data," violating state consumer protection and privacy laws.

OH: Some Ohio inmates to be offered anti-addiction drug Vivitrol on release

dispatch.com

Starting Oct. 1, inmates released from the Franklin County jail in Ohio can choose to be injected with Vivitrol, a drug that prevents opioid and alcohol relapses, the newest step taken by a task force to combat an epidemic of overdose deaths.

ME: Maine panel proposes 20 percent tax on recreational marijuana

mainepublic.org

Mainers could pay a 20 percent sales tax on purchases of recreational marijuana if a bill proposed by the Legislature’s marijuana implementation committee becomes law. The tax is double what was proposed in a ballot initiative approved by voters last year. But it’s similar to the effective tax rates in the seven other states that allow for the retail sale of recreational marijuana.

UT: Gay couple denied baby through surrogate challenges Utah law

ap.org

A gay couple denied the chance to have a baby using a surrogate challenged a Utah law's reference to heterosexual parents. The case before the Utah Supreme Court illustrates the legal complications LGBT couples can face when starting families amid a national patchwork of surrogacy laws.

MD: Maryland governor wants to sue the FAA over airport noise

washingtonpost.com

Republican Gov. Larry Hogan directed Maryland’s attorney general to sue the Federal Aviation Administration over increases in airplane noise tied to the agency’s efforts to modernize air traffic operations. Hogan said new flight paths in and out of Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall and Reagan National airports have made “many Maryland families miserable in their own homes.”

CO: Marijuana grow operations create new challenge for utilities

thecannabist.co

Colorado utilities have had to adapt on the fly to marijuana grow operations — legal and illegal — that are heavy users of electricity. The new customers also bring security risks from all-cash transactions.

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