What We’re Reading: Top State Stories 6/10

  • June 10, 2016

US: 21 states sue Delaware over abandoned money orders

ap.org

The states seek more than $150 million in uncashed money orders from Delaware, where more than 1 million businesses take advantage of friendly incorporating laws and unclaimed financial property is a major source of state revenue. The states’ claim comes in a lawsuit filed in the U.S. Supreme Court and involves money orders routed from Texas-based MoneyGram. Read about this and other state news from around the country.

LA: In first week, 200,000 enroll in Louisiana’s expanded Medicaid program

theadvocate.com

Louisiana is the first state to use existing food stamp eligibility information to determine whether people are now eligible for Medicaid because the two programs have similar income requirements. The goal is to get 375,000 new adults — mostly the working poor — onto the state’s Medicaid rolls in the coming year.

CA: No constitutional right to concealed guns, federal appeals court says

reuters.com

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said California officials can deny concealed gun permits to gun owners, a ruling in line with appellate court decisions in New York, Maryland and New Jersey. The U.S. Constitution doesn’t protect the carrying of concealed firearms, the majority opinion said.

UT: Utah’s lawsuit seeking federal lands nearly ready

sltrib.com

A draft of Utah's lawsuit demanding the federal government turn over 30 million acres to the state is almost done. It will be up to Republican Attorney General Sean Reyes and Gov. Gary Herbert to decide whether to file the complaint and commit the state to litigation with a projected price tag of $14 million.

KY: Kentucky busts another illegal moonshine still

kentucky.com

Agents with the Kentucky Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control have shut down the second illegal moonshine operation they’ve discovered in three months. Agents seized a still, a dozen gallon containers of moonshine, a bag of empty jugs, a record-keeping book and a small amount of marijuana.

MS: Mississippi needs record revenue this month to balance budget

mississippitoday.com

Mississippi needs to take in a record $725 million to $750 million in tax revenue in June to balance this fiscal year's budget. Republican Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves said he doesn’t know whether the state will make it.

IL: Illinois' credit rating downgraded again

chicagotribune.com

Illinois' worst-in-the-nation credit rating has sunk even lower. A pair of Wall Street agencies issued another downgrade, citing the record-breaking budget impasse that one analyst said has left the state “increasingly vulnerable.”

NJ: New Jersey lawmakers propose commission to fix public school funding

newjersey.news12.com

Lawmakers propose establishing a commission to devise a new funding formula for New Jersey’s chronically underfunded schools. The commission would have a year to find a way to fill a $1 billion deficit in an education system that the state Supreme Court says leaves about 80 percent of school districts underfunded.

NV: Nevada regains almost all of 175K jobs lost in recession

reviewjournal.com

Nevada has regained nearly all of the jobs lost during the Great Recession and should fully recover later this year, a state economist said.

MD: Fentanyl and heroin deaths continue steep rise in Maryland

washingtonpost.com

Overdose deaths from the powerful synthetic opioid that killed rock legend Prince in April increased 83 percent in Maryland last year, the state’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said.

MT: Montana governor announces public land access initiatives

billingsgazette.com

Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock announced steps to increase access to Montana’s inaccessible public land for fishing, hunting and recreation in an effort to unleash an estimated $6 billion in economic activity from outdoor activities.

HI: Costs of Hawaii rail project keep rising

civilbeat.com

Honolulu’s rail project — originally priced at about $5.2 billion — is now set to cost as much as $8 billion to build and likely won’t be completed for eight more years. The Hawaii city has $6.8 billion set aside to pay for the project.

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