Sequester Hits Special Education Like 'Ton of Bricks'

  • September 10, 2013
  • By Adrienne Lu
Speech Language Pathologist for Berkeley County Schools Trisha Palmer (right) assists high school student Tiffany Ronk in Martinsburg, W.Va. Personnel, materials and technology to help students with disabilities are being cut by the federal sequester. (AP)

Since the first day of class for most schools in Michigan last week, Marcie Lipsitt's phone has been ringing nonstop with parents distraught about cuts to their children's special education services.

A new round of special education cuts were taking hold, prompted by a 5 percent reduction in federal funding of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), said Lipsitt, a longtime advocate for disabled children and co-chair of the Michigan Alliance for Special Education.

Lipsitt said it means that many schools have eliminated resource rooms where children can go to get help in areas such as math, reading, writing and organizational skills. Many schools will have fewer speech, occupational or physical therapists, along with social workers and school psychologists, which means students who previously received speech therapy twice a week might only receive it once week, for example. And in some general education classrooms that had two teachers – one for the whole class and one specifically to support students with special needs – the special education teacher has been eliminated.

Estimated reductions in dollars in federal funding to the states in fiscal year 2013 for Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Part B Grants, following 5 percent sequestration cuts.

US

$578,892,762

AL

8,915,770

AK

1,919,022

AZ 

10,040,553

AR

5,633,069

CA

62,855,318

CO

8,108,108

CT

6,314,489

DE

1,839,638

FL

31,092,117

GA

17,458,448 

HI

2,035,593

ID

2,865,332

IL

24,657,563

IN

12,376,969

IA

5,770,827

KS

5,251,785

KY

7,688,909

LA

9,752,289

ME

2,586,535

MD

9,719,363

MA

13,418,282

MI

20,279,289

MN

9,199,308

MS

6,123,987

MO

10,762,593

MT

1,919,022

NE

3,529,607

NV

3,775,945

NH

2,247,666

NJ

17,085,902

NM

4,354,823

NY

36,378,359

NC

16,776,161

ND

1,493,764

OH

22,008,413

OK

7,300,677

OR

6,372,225

PA

21,381,079

RI

2,067,098

SC

8,583,510

SD

1,779,462

TN

11,706,600

TX

51,026,919

UT

5,672,990

VT

1,440,274

VA

13,878,260

WA

11,251,352

WV

3,589,871

WI

10,097,151

WY

  1,510,990

DC

924,976

Source: U.S. Department of Education

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“For Michigan, it hit like a ton of bricks,” Lipsitt said. “Conditions are eroding and children are not being allowed to become taxpayers. They're not being given access to independence, being productive, being ready for a global workforce.”

Across the country, advocates for children with disabilities are grappling with the impact of sequestration, the automatic budget cuts that kicked in when Congress failed to reach an agreement to reduce the federal budget. Although the cuts took effect March 1, the impact did not reach schools until the start of the current school year because of the way many education programs are funded.

Experts agree there is little hard data on the impact of the budget cuts on special education. The U.S. Department of Education estimates the sequester cut about $579 million in federal funding for IDEA Part B, which supports students age 3-21 with specific learning disabilities, speech or language impairments, intellectual disabilities, autism or emotional disturbances.

The National Education Association estimates that if states and local school systems did not replace any of the funds lost through sequestration, nearly 300,000 students receiving special education services would be affected. The union estimated up to 7,800 jobs could be lost as a result of the federal budget cuts.

All told, 6.5 million disabled children from ages 3-21 received services funded by the IDEA in the fall of 2011, the most recent number available.

Tricky Funding Formulas

It is unknown how many states or schools districts will replace some or all of that money from other sources, such as new tax revenues or cuts to other programs. But they may hesitate to replace federal funding even if they have the resources. That's because by law, states and school districts that raise their funding for special education and then later reduce it, after adjusting for enrollment and other factors, can see their funding from the federal government cut. That requirement, known as maintenance of effort, means that even if the federal government eventually replaces the money cut through the sequester, school districts will be on the hook to spend more than they did before the automatic federal budget cuts.

Because of the maintenance of effort requirement many school districts have worked hard even through several years of state budget cuts to preserve special education funding to avoid risking their federal special education funding.

Noelle Ellerson, associate executive director of public policy and advocacy for AASA, the School Superintendents Association, said that as a result, “Over the course of the recession, the cuts in a school district's budget have disproportionately been on general education students,” although disabled students are often affected along with everybody else by reductions in services to general education students, such as larger class size. 

But in a survey by AASA earlier this year on the impact of the recession on schools, more superintendents indicated that special education spending would decline for the first time in the nearly five years the survey has been conducted. Ellerson said that in previous years, school systems were able to cover the cuts in federal funding, but superintendents indicated this year they can no longer do so because of continuing recessionary pressures and the depth of the sequestration cuts.

Those cuts further exacerbate the federal government's chronic underfunding of its contribution toward the education of students with disabilities. Under the IDEA, the federal government committed to giving states funding for up to 40 percent of the difference between the cost of educating a disabled student and a general student. The most the federal government has ever given the states is 18.5 percent in 2005 (aside from a one-time infusion of economic stimulus funding in fiscal year 2009), and the figure has been declining since, according to Joel Packer, executive director of the Committee for Education Funding, a coalition of education organizations. Under the sequester, the federal share fell to 14.9 percent, the lowest federal contribution by percent dating to 2001.

Federal funding aside, local school systems are obligated by law to provide children with disabilities with a free appropriate education.

“It doesn't matter what the feds send down to the locals and the states in federal support, the law requires that states and local school districts identify and serve every student that they deem to be eligible and in need of special education,” said Candace Cortiella, director of The Advocacy Institute. The institute is a nonprofit that provides training for special education advocates and runs the web site IDEA Money Watch, which tracks federal funding for special education.

“There can be no consideration given to how much money there is to spend. That really puts the states and the local districts in quite a precarious situation,” Cortiella said.

What States Are Doing

The impact of the sequester on special education varies from state to state and even district to district.

In Virginia, most school districts have been able to weather the special education funding cuts so far by not replacing teachers who leave, according to John Eisenberg, assistant superintendent for special education and student services. Many school systems have also reduced or eliminated staff development, which is critical in special education.

“There's constant change in the field in terms of making sure folks are up to speed and are using research-based practices for students,” Eisenberg said. “As we have learned more and more about things like autism, the field has changed. Getting teachers trained in the most recent research-based practices is critical.”

Virginia schools have also reported big cuts in budgets for materials and technologies to support students with disabilities, which can include electronic devices to help nonverbal students communicate, technology to help students who are hearing-impaired and computers to enlarge text, for example.

In Florida, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties found the money to keep their special education programming intact. But nearby Broward County this year eliminated five of 11 behavior specialists, 10 program specialists and an assistive technology position, according to Mark Halpert, director of the Florida Advocacy Coalition for Learning Disabilities.

Halpert worries about the damage a second year of sequestration could inflict.

“These kids are smart – they learn differently, have challenges and can be enormously successful,” Halpert said. “We owe it as a society to help them succeed.”