Stateline Story

Vote for -- None of the above

"None of the above" could win any state or local race under a first-of-its-kind measure put before the Massachusetts Legislature, triggering a new election in 60 to 80 days.  The Boston Globe reports the bill hasn't gained much traction. Nevada since 1975 has listed "None of the above" as a choice on statewide ballots, though it is nonbinding 

As if the Indianapolis Colts' defeat of the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI wasn't bad enough, the Hoosier State now is horning in on the Land of Lincoln's claim to its most famous son. Welcome signs along the border with Illinois are being changed to tout Indiana as "Lincoln's Boyhood Home," reports the Chicago Sun-Times . Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, was born in Kentucky and lived in Indiana for 14 of his 56 years, during what the paper notes were the "formative years" of age 7 to 21.  

Survivor: Statehouse Edition. The Colorado House will go live on cable television and the Internet next year, and lawmakers are asking residents to help them choose the title, according to The Denver Post . A contest to name the broadcast, launched by legislators, has attracted hundreds of entries, including some not-so-flattering suggestions: "Colorado Capitol Punishment," "House of Pain," "ALOHA - A Lot of Hot Air," and "C-RAP," the paper reports.

This warranty doesn't cover political casualties. The Michigan Democratic Party paid $12,000 at an auction to buy the state-owned 2005 Ford Five Hundred previously driven by state Supreme Court Chief Justice Clifford Taylor, a Republican. Taylor, who faces re-election in 2008, was among more than two dozen other judges who drove state cars but who turned them in after a Detroit Free Press story. Democratic Chairman Mark Brewer told The Associated Press he plans to use the car for party business, including campaigning against Taylor's re-election.

Maybe they're waiting until it comes out on DVD. Utah physician and trial lawyer Clark Newhall invited all 104 members of the state Legislature and several of the state's health care officials to a screening of filmmaker Michael Moore's latest feature, "Sicko," about the problems with the U.S. health-care system. But only two Democratic lawmakers took up Newhall's offer, according to The Deseret News . Just one Republican even bothered to R.S.V.P., the paper reported.