Anthony T. Charles, Ph.D.

Title
Director
Institution
Saint Mary’s University School of the Environment Selection Committee (2013-16)
Country
Canada
E-mail
tony.charles[at]smu.ca
Award Year
2001

Research

Anthony “Tony” Charles is director of the School of the Environment and a professor in the Sobey School of Business at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Charles used his Pew fellowship to provide a positive, conservation-oriented response to the Canadian Supreme Court’s 1999 Marshall decision, which recognizes native commercial fishing rights. The vision of his initiative, entitled “Turning the Tide: Communities Managing Fisheries Together,” is to make community-based fisheries management a prominent form of fisheries management in Atlantic Canada. Charles sees his path to this goal as promoting and supporting the management of fisheries at a community level, because he believes that the sustainability of fisheries is tied closely to local-level management and to the development of cooperative endeavors linking natives and nonnatives. This project is unique in Atlantic Canada in providing focused organization and financial support for community-based fishery management, and therefore is being seen increasingly as a crucial element in enabling organizations related to the fisheries to achieve a positive shift in management approach. The project has provided facilitation and coordination support for specific concrete activities related to community-based fisheries and coastal management. Such support can range from the very local (such as work with the Bear River First Nation, a native tribe that has had no access to the Canadian fisheries) to the potentially global. “Turning the Tide” also developed a plan for communications, education, and outreach to promote and support community-based management. Today, Charles continues to specialize in studies of fishery governance, management, and socioeconomics, and is particularly known for his work on the sustainability and resilience of coastal and marine systems, on community-based resource management, and on human dimensions of ecosystem-based management and climate change.

To learn more about Charles, visit his bio online: http://smu-facweb.smu.ca/~charles/WEBPAGES/students.htm.