The Coral Sea: Protecting an Australian Marine Jewel

"Greater stewardship of the Coral Sea is urgently needed given the rapid decline of large ocean fish, the onset of climate change and many other threats facing our oceans."

-Imogen Zethoven, director of the Global Ocean Legacy Coral Sea campaign

Australia's Coral Sea—located north and east of the world-renowned Great Barrier Reef—is one of the few places on the planet where large marine animals can still be found in great numbers. Named for its many coral reefs and atolls, the Coral Sea is home to sharks, dolphins, whales, and turtles as well as a wide variety of fish species. Spectacular coral reefs, remote islands, underwater mountains and deep-sea canyons are also found here.

Due to its remoteness from land, the Coral Sea has remained relatively unspoiled. However, less than one percent of this marine jewel is fully protected.

In May 2009, then-Australian Environment Minister Peter Garrett took a crucial first step towards conserving the Coral Sea's biodiversity by declaring the Coral Sea Conservation Zone, which allows the Australian government to assess these waters for permanent protection.golcs-classic-coral-450-mfk022311.jpg

"Greater stewardship of the Coral Sea is urgently needed given the rapid decline of large ocean fish, the onset of climate change and many other threats facing our oceans," said Imogen Zethoven, director of the Global Ocean Legacy Coral Sea campaign. "

In partnership with Australian conservation organizations through the Protect our Coral Sea coalition campaign, the Pew Environment Group's Global Ocean Legacy is calling for a fully protected marine park in the Coral Sea. Without a high level of protection, the beauty and biodiversity of the Coral Sea will time.