The 'Devil's Staircase'

"There are few places in the state more truly wild than this unique and remarkably secluded wonder."

-David Dreher, CAW policy manager

Wassen Creek, in the heart of the Oregon Coast Range, abounds with wild salmon. The creek runs within a lush old-growth forest inhabited by spotted owls, elk, black bear, mountain lions, otters and other wildlife.

The creek also forms the Devil's Staircase, a series of cascading pools resembling a set of stairs. A bill introduced in the 111th Congress, that we expect will be reintroduced, would officially designate Wassen Creek as a wilderness area, including the Devil's Staircase deep within the coast range and one of the most remote areas in Oregon.

While the U.S. Forest Service protects certain areas along Wassen Creek as wilderness, the Bureau of Land Management, which is responsible for the rest of the territory, has not followed suit. This leaves pristine natural sites such as the Devil's Staircase vulnerable to road construction and other destructive activities.

"There are few places in the state more truly wild than this unique and remarkably secluded wonder," says David Dreher, policy manager for the Pew Environment Group's Campaign for America's Wilderness.

The Campaign for America's Wilderness works with local activist groups across the nation to push for new wilderness designations as a natural legacy for future generations.