About

Daniel Carlat

Daniel Carlat

  • Director
  • Prescription Project,
  • The Pew Charitable Trusts

Profile

Dr. Daniel Carlat is directs Pew's prescription project, which seeks to ensure transparency in physician-industry relationships and promotes policies to reduce or manage conflicts of interest that could affect patient care.

Before joining Pew, Carlat was a practicing psychiatrist and was president and CEO of Carlat Publishing LLC, which publishes non-industry supported continuing medical education newsletters for psychiatrists and other mental health practitioners.

Carlat is the author of numerous peer-reviewed articles and professional books in psychiatry, most notably The Psychiatric Interview: A Practical Guide, currently in its third edition and translated into several languages. In addition to his professional writing, Dr. Carlat has written about conflicts of interest for the New York Times, the New York Times Magazine, and Wired. His article for The New York Times Magazine, "Dr. Drug Rep", was selected for Harper Perennial’s Best Science Writing 2008 anthology. 

In 2010, he published his first book for a general audience, Unhinged: A Doctor’s Alarming Revelations about a Profession in Crisis. The book, which proposes solutions for reforming the  mental health care system in the U.S., has garnered significant media attention, including a July 2010 interview on NPR’s Fresh Air.

Dr. Carlat received his M.D. at the University of California, San Francisco, and completed his psychiatric  residency at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He is associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Tufts School of Medicine.

Recent Work

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  • Decisions Loom for Some of Philadelphia’s Historic Sacred Places

    Buildings constructed as houses of worship have long enriched Philadelphia’s urban landscape, embodying the city’s legacy of art and architecture and adding to a history of religious and ethnic diversity. In addition, these structures have provided a range of community services that reach beyond their own congregations into the surrounding neighborhoods. Read More

  • Vicksburg National Military Park

    During the Civil War, possession of Vicksburg, Mississippi—known as the Gibraltar of the Confederacy—meant controlling the Mississippi River. On July 4, 1863, the Union Army captured the city perched on bluffs after an almost seven-week siege. Coupled with the Confederate States Army’s defeat at Gettysburg the day before, Vicksburg marked a major turning point in the war. Read More

  • Protection for the Weddell Sea

    The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) is considering a proposal that would create a marine reserve in the Weddell Sea covering 700,000 square miles (1.8 million square kilometers). The Weddell Sea is a remote, ice-covered embayment east of the Antarctic Peninsula, and one of the most pristine marine ecosystems in the world. This area is a unique habitat... Read More

Media Contact

Tami Holzman

Officer, Communications

202.552.2122