About

Brenna Erford

Brenna Erford

  • Manager
  • State Fiscal Health and Economic Growth,
  • The Pew Charitable Trusts

Profile

Brenna Erford manages Pew's work on state budget policy, which helps states identify strategies to better manage fiscal pressures resulting from economic and revenue volatility. Erford oversees the project's work with state budget leaders, including technical assistance to develop and adopt policy solutions. She also manages a team of researchers who identify and analyze proven approaches that serve as models for states. She is a frequent conference speaker and has testified before state legislative bodies as well as professional associations.

Before joining Pew in 2013, Erford worked on state fiscal and tax issues in a research and advocacy capacity at the North Carolina Budget and Tax Center.  She previously served as a fiscal analyst for the North Carolina General Assembly’s nonpartisan Fiscal Research Division and as a legislative analyst for the Illinois General Assembly’s Office of the House Minority Leader. Erford received a bachelor’s degree in rhetoric from the University of Illinois and holds a master’s degree in public administration from North Carolina State University.

Recent Work

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  • Kansas Becomes the 47th State to Create a Rainy Day Fund

    With the enactment of House Bill 2739 on May 17, 2016, Kansas joins 46 other states with a legally defined rainy day fund, creating a path for effective long-term savings. The bill received bipartisan support and was passed unanimously in both chambers of the state Legislature. The Senate Committee on Ways and Means, chaired by Senator Ty Masterson, and the House Committee on... Read More

  • Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis

    Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis, an interactive resource from The Pew Charitable Trusts, allows you to sort and analyze data on key fiscal, economic, and demographic trends in the 50 states and understand their impact on states’ fiscal health. Read More

  • Long-Term Obligations Vary as a Share of State Resources

    States commit to future spending when they borrow, when they fall short of fully funding pension promises, or when they commit to providing retiree health care benefits to their public employees. Unfunded pension costs grew the most and were the largest of these obligations in a majority of states, as of 2013. Read More

Media Contact

Sarah Leiseca

Officer, Communications

202.540.6369