About

Brenna Erford

Brenna Erford

  • Manager
  • State Fiscal Health and Economic Growth,
  • The Pew Charitable Trusts

Profile

Brenna Erford manages Pew's work on state budget policy, which helps states identify strategies to better manage fiscal pressures resulting from economic and revenue volatility. Erford oversees the project's work with state budget leaders, including technical assistance to develop and adopt policy solutions. She also manages a team of researchers who identify and analyze proven approaches that serve as models for states. She is a frequent conference speaker and has testified before state legislative bodies as well as professional associations.

Before joining Pew in 2013, Erford worked on state fiscal and tax issues in a research and advocacy capacity at the North Carolina Budget and Tax Center.  She previously served as a fiscal analyst for the North Carolina General Assembly’s nonpartisan Fiscal Research Division and as a legislative analyst for the Illinois General Assembly’s Office of the House Minority Leader. Erford received a bachelor’s degree in rhetoric from the University of Illinois and holds a master’s degree in public administration from North Carolina State University.

Recent Work

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  • Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis

    Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis, an interactive resource from The Pew Charitable Trusts, allows you to sort and analyze data on key fiscal, economic, and demographic trends in the 50 states and understand their impact on states’ fiscal health. Read More

  • Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis

    Pew’s Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis presents 50-state data on key fiscal, economic, and demographic indicators and analyzes their impact on states’ long-term fiscal health. Drill down into state finances in five core areas. Read More

  • Personal Income Growth Shows Uneven U.S. Recovery

    One of the longest U.S. economic expansions in history has lifted personal income in all states. But growth has varied, from a constant annual rate of less than 1 percent in Nevada to almost 5 percent in North Dakota since the start of the Great Recession. Weakening energy prices have cost four states some of those gains, though, over the year ending in the first quarter of 2016.  Read More

Media Contact

Sarah Leiseca

Officer, Communications

202.540.6369