Anita Pepper

Anita Pepper

  • Director
  • Biomedical Programs,
  • The Pew Charitable Trusts


Dr. Anita Pepper is the director of Pew's biomedical programs, which include the biomedical scholars and Latin American fellows programs.  These initiatives support groundbreaking research by funding outstanding, competitively selected scientists at the beginning of their careers.

Before joining Pew, Pepper completed postdoctoral training with Dr. Tom Jongens at the University of Pennsylvania studying a genetically inherited form of mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome.  In 2008, she decided to use her scientific background outside of academia and joined the Pew programs in the biomedical sciences.

She received a Ph.D. in developmental genetics and a master’s degree in molecular systematics from New York University. She also holds a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University.

Recent Work

View All
  • Pew Scholars Honored for Outstanding Genetic Research

    Pew scholars Maria Barna, Ph.D., and Carolyn McBride, Ph.D., were named winners Sept. 1 of the 2016 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award. Given every three years by the Genetics Society of America, this prestigious award recognizes outstanding genetic research by women early in their independent faculty careers. Barna and McBride were honored for their diligence, creativity, and promising... Read More

  • Pew Scholar Stephen Elledge Wins 2015 Lasker Award

    Stephen Elledge, Ph.D., an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, professor at Harvard Medical School and 1991 Pew scholar, has been named co-winner of the 2015 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for his groundbreaking work to uncover how cells respond to damaged DNA. First given in 1945, the Lasker Award is considered one of the world’s highest scientific honors and... Read More

  • Pew Scholar Identifies Potential Targets for Treating ALS

    ALS, the disease that was the focus of the Ice Bucket Challenge campaign on social media last year, has confounded scientists for decades. People afflicted with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the neurodegenerative illness also called Lou Gehrig’s disease, gradually lose their ability to walk, speak, and eventually breathe. Treatment options are limited, and there is no known cure. Read More

Media Contact

Matt Mulkey

Manager, Communications